Damage Report, Burma, Iraq and NYC

9-11 was perhaps one of the most definitive moments in recent history, one that is and will, in many ways, shape the identity of a whole generation and is working to define relationships around the world. A friend, recently visiting New York, wrote:

Iran around by the 911 site. there is nothing there after so long. streets are barely mended, side walks end, over head walk way from surrounding building just dead end in the area leading to this concrete hole in the earth. everything is fairly cleaned out, and there are fences that surround the whole place with police every 100 yards. lights shine on the hole making it reflect into the sky, lighting the surrounding area. there is not much movement around there at all. very odd, eary feeling.

Even as the world pleads with the irrationality of Myanmar’s military regime, encouraging them to use peaceful means in deailng with the people of the country, that government seems to once again cement its grip. A recent email conversation with a former boss at the Bangkok based NGO Forum Asia included some comments about the situation in Burma. In regards to finding a Burmese speaker who could do some translating, she said,

“It is a bit difficult because of the situation inside getting worst and worst. People very afriad, more arresed, people cannot go out from the house.
The temples were raised, the monks are beaten and took to some place that we didn’t know. Sorry I could not help.”
burma monks.jpg

Even as the world pleads with the irrationality of Myanmar’s military regime, encouraging them to use peaceful means in deailng with the people of the country,
The US military, according to the New York Times this morning (quoting a security think tank), is looking ahead to the military challenges/ situation that it may be facing in the future Iraq. One expert says that the military should be prepared for three different kinds of threats: Irregular warfare, treats from guerrillas or counterinsurgency groups; other countries that may come to compromise American interests in the region (they are particularly worried about China); and the scary possibility of non-state groups posing a “catastrophic challenge,” the possible use of biological or nuclear weapons.

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