Archive for the 'Travels' category

People of Sichuan Province

The Chinese New Year this year, welcoming the year of the Sheep, was a great opportunity to get out of the capital city, Beijing, and see the holiday from a very different perspective. Not only is the Province of Sichuan ethnically different, with many more ethnic minorities, including a very large Tibetan population, but the practice of religion is much more widespread, the history is quite distinct from that of Beijing, the landscape and climate are incredibly different, and, perhaps above all else, it is simply not as urban and the attitude of most of the people I encountered reflected that.

Everyone was so busy either being a tourist or doing their own holiday thing, that it was a great opportunity for me to watch people, and simply be a more or less ignored observer.

So, a “People of Sichuan” series.
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The New Year events, such as the light and lantern festival, and the traditional performances, attract people from all walks of life. The festivals seem to be held in parks, temples, or other such public spaces.

Biking is, indeed, a fairly common form of transportation in dense urban areas, such as downtown Chengdu, the provincial capital.

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A fairly universal characteristic of Chinese cities is the virtual armies of orange clad public employees sweeping the streets.
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This group of young monks seemed to be on a sort of pilgrimage to see, and pray to, the giant Buddha at Leshan. Sichuan People (2) (800x533)

Playing cards where three rivers join in the city of Yibin.Sichuan People (3) (800x533)

Fruit seller at the night market, the night before New Year’s Eve, Yibin. Sichuan People (5) (800x533)

A Buddhist nun preparing for that evening’s New Year celebration at the temple. Sichuan People (6) (800x533)

A team of chefs, members of the minority from Xinjiang, famous for their lamb kabobs. Sichuan People (7) (800x533)

Hanging out at People’s Park at the heart of Chengdu.
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Maintaining public order, on Segway. Sichuan People (9) (800x533)

People’s Park, Chengdu. Sichuan People (10) (800x533)

New Year’s Day celebration and performances at Wuhou Temple, Chengdu.Sichuan People (11) (800x533) Sichuan People (12) (800x533) Sichuan People (13) (800x533) Sichuan People (16) (800x533) Sichuan People (17) (800x533) Sichuan People (18) (533x800) Sichuan People (19) (800x533) Sichuan People (20) (800x533) Sichuan People (21) (533x800)

Mt. Emei, Sichuan

OK, so the pictures uploaded in reverse order… but you get the idea. The temple at the “Golden Peak” sits at over 3,000 meters. The map said I hiked over 15 kilometers from the base to the top… my legs sure felt like it. I stayed at a hotel near the summit and hiked up the next morning for the sunrise.

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The climate in this part of Sichuan is very humid, even in February, and although it wasn’t particularly cold, the wet air made it easy to get a chill.

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Above the clouds on Mt. Emei.

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Locals wandered the streets of Emei Town outside the park selling pairs of small steel spikes that hikers could tie on the bottom of their shoes. I bought a pair, assuming it was just a tourist thing. But it turns out they were completely necessary once I approached the summit, where the snow had packed down on the stone stairs, becoming a virtual ice slide.

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The predawn hike up the final few kilometers was completely worth it, as the sun rose up and across the mountains, illuminating the sea of clouds below.

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Monkeys in the monestary. Emei mountain has several old Buddhist monestaries that perch on its cliffs. It also has an abundance of monkeys that have grown far too bold as local tourists throw food at them.

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The week before the Chinese New Year holiday, there were probably fewer fellow hikers than at any other time of the year.

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Eating the Turkey – a Retrospective

No, I consumed no turkey in Turkey. Chicken indeed, fish and olives in abundance, however.

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Local or Tourist?

Empires Come, Empires Go

The church on the cliff in Amasra, Turkey, on the Black Sea coast, was built in the early AD’s, then destroyed, rebuilt, then turned into a mosque, then back into a church, saw medieval castle walls rise around it and crumble away, and then turned into a mosque again.

Turkey’s Black Sea coast has patiently waited out the rise and fall of empires and civilizations, tribes and armies and kings and generals slaughtering and assimilating each other for control of heaven on earth ports, Amasra chief among them.
The Amazons, Phoenicians, Persians, Romans, Byzantines, and Ottomans have all come and gone.
Today, for the few months of summer anyway, Amasra is a coveted refuge away from the realities of Turkish life (few foreigners seem to holiday here), with a thriving industry of fish restaurants and beach chair renters, and UNESCO World Heritage medieval ruins.
If only I had more than two days.

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Ballooning in Cappadocia

… But worth the steep ticket price. Unique geography, and human history stretching millennia. Anatolia, Turkey.

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The Turks In Turkey

That is Ted. That is not a Turk. But it is in Turkey. Istanbul.
The cliche “east meets west” romanticization is in fact quite accurate, Persian rugs draped across Byzantine era stone rooms that now house Italian cafes.

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Istanbul isn’t all Byzantine churches and ottoman mosques, though there’s plenty of that.

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There’s also classy restaurants on the Bosporus or in Nevizade, modern art museums and hipster bars.

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Museums in China

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I love museums. History museums, art museums, (in China) Revolution museums. And in a country very concerned about writing the past in order to explain the present, museums are in abundance in China. I have been especially struck, impressed, by the art museums I have found. Beijing is full of all sorts, traditional, modern, imperial, minority.

 

 

 

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Nanjing: City Walls and College Towns

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Longmen Grottoes